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Brazilian farmers blame India for WTO talks collapse
22 Jun, 2007 l 0530 hrs ISTlAFP

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BRASILIA: Brazilian farmers have blamed India for being the main cause for the collapse of World Trade Organisation talks in Germany.

"India was the major complicating element in these negotiations -- through its resistance, its service demands and its totally inflexible position," spokesman Antonio Donizeti of the National Confederation of Agriculture and Livestock (CNA) told AFP on Thursday.

"This alliance between Brazil and India is everything that the Brazilian farming industry did not want," he added.

Brazil and India, representing the developing world, walked out on talks with the United States and European Union yesterday during WTO negotiations in Germany that aimed for multilateral agreement on farm subsidies and open markets.

In Washington, US President George W Bush accused Brazil and India of fighting for their own interests at the expense of poorer countries.

Nevertheless, there was plenty of blame to go around, Donizeti said.

"Brazil also assumes part of the responsibility because the Brazilian government is very aggressive (in its demands) on agriculture," he said.

"And on industrial products there was not a very flexible position, while this was a very strong demand by the US and EU."

The United States and European Union were also guilty for "difficulty improving their offer of access to the market and internal support," he said.

"All sides are guilty and there are no winners," said Donizeti, highlighting however that Brazilian farmers had the most to lose because it stands to miss out on USD 10 billion worth of potential exports if a trade accord fails.

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